Vampire, Life-Stealing

Chris Van Deelen

Chris Van Deelen is the author of the Skirmisher Publishing LLC sourcebook Creatures of the Tropical Wastes sourcebook, co-author of its Wisdom from the Wastelands game supplement and contributor to the 'Sword of Kos: Hekaton' Anthology.

No. Enc: 1d3
Alignment:  Chaotic
Movement: 90’ (30’)
                    150’ (50’) Flying
AC: 7
HD: 12
Attacks: 2 claws or 1 bite and special (see description)
Damage: 1d8 / 1d8 or 1d6 and special (see description)
Save: L
Morale:10
Hoard Class: None

As is the case with many monsters found in the wastes, legend has it that the Life Stealing Vampire is actually an alien life form that almost caused the complete and utter depopulation of England back during the late 20 th century. But then again, most creatures have a legend behind them. Funny though how many legends have their origin in fact, and not myth.

These horrific monsters have two basic appearances. First, they always appear as young, beautiful or handsome men and women. The physical appearance is quite literally pulled from the mind of a victim, in order to put the victim at ease. The victim will be drawn to the monster without any cause for fear or apprehension.

The second form is that of a hairless vampire bat, with a wing span of well over fifteen feet in length, and a hideous visage that is enough to put the fear of god into the most stalwart of warriors. In either form, the creatures are around average human height and weight.

No one knows how long these creatures can live, and once again legend has it that those encountered are the same ones that originally caused the near-total destruction of the UK isles. At the same time, no one knows if, or how, they reproduce, although again it is speculated that they are of both sexes, since they appear as male and female to those who observe them.

In combat, they attack only one creature at a time. They approach the creature and gaze into their eyes and then the victim must make a save versus death. If the save fails, the monster then begins to draw out the victim’s life-force, which can be seen with the naked eye as a blue shimmering cascade of energy. The attack takes 1d6 rounds to complete and if the creature is able to finish drawing out the victim’s life energy all that is left is a desiccated, nearly skeletal corpse.

The monster then heals any damage it has sustained, and gains an additional number of hit points equal to 2x the victim’s constitution score (or in the case of creatures without a constitution score, they gain 2 hit points per hit dice.

These hit points last for 48 hours or until they are removed as the creature sustains damage. There is no limit to the number of extra hit points the creature can have as a result.

But that isn’t the worst aspect of these creatures. The creatures that they kill are suddenly resurrected exactly two hours after their death, appearing as animated corpses. These creatures