Runequest Thursday #11, Part Deux - The Dingball, a Mythos Guide to New ENgland Monsters run through the Runequestificator!

Clint Staples

Dingball

 

 

Location

Melee

Ranged

Armour

Hit Points

STR

18

R. Hind Leg

1-3

1-3

1

CON

27

L. Hind Leg

4-6

4-6

1

SIZ

15

Tail

7-8

7

4

8

DEX

20

Hindquarters

9-11

8 -11

1

8

INT

5

Forequarters

12-14

12-15

1

9

POW

16

R. Front Leg

15-16

16-17

1

8

Actions

2

L. Front Leg

17-18

18-19

1

8

Move

10

Head

19-20

20

 

8

SR

12

Defense 20%

 

 

 

 

HP

25

 

 

 

 

 

Damage Bonus: +1d4

Weapons: Tail club –  SR 13 / 55% /1d8+1d4 Damage Bonus; If the DIngball is attacking with its tailclub from above, or from ambush, its chance to hit rises to 75%.

Claw – SR 12 / 50% / 1d6 +1d4 Damage Bonus

Bite – SR 12 / 45% / 1d10+1d4 Damage Bonus

Armor Points – 1, except bony tail which has 4.

Skills: Hide 80%, Jump 40%, Spot 50%, Sneak 60%

Note: You may choose to make the Dingball a chaotic creature, in which case it would have 1d3 chaos features. You can roll them from the chaos features table in just about any Runequest core book ever written.

 

I hear you asking, 'Why convert the DIngball to Runequest?'

Hey, a game that has creatures like the Walktapus [a chaotic aberration composed of an octopus on a humanoid/ deep-one-y body] and the Jackobear [another chaos thingy - a bear with a hideous head shaped like a carved halloween pumpkin] deserves the Dingball. Nuff said.

The Dingball is a rare and reclusive creature, perhaps the product of errant dragon magic from the ancient Empire of the Wyrm Friends. It might also derive from the corruption of chaos upon a natural lynx or even a shadowcat, the alynx sacred to Yinkin, brother god to Orlanth. If this last option is chosen, allow the DIngball 1d3 chaos features, rolled randomly, and the ability to Hide in shadows at 120% [imposing a 20% penalty on anyone looking to find one there].

Whatever the cause of the Dingball, it is a terrible ambush hunter, not afraid to prey on humanoids. its hunting cry can be eerily similar to that of a shrieking child or a terrified woman, something that often draws good-intentioned prey near.