Chapter VIII: Hajji Baba Escapes from the Turcomans. The Meaning of 'Falling from the Frying-Pan into the Fire' Illustrated 'We shall soon see that,' answered the prince. 'Call the ferashes,' said he to one of his officers, 'and let them beat the...
Chapter VII: Hajji Baba Evinces a Feeling Disposition. The History of the Poet Asker I discovered what I had before suspected, that he was a man of consequence, for he was no less a personage that the court poet, enjoying the title of Melek al Shoherah, or Prince of Poets. He...
Chapter VI: Concerning the Three Prisoners Taken by the Turcomans and the Booty Made in the Caravanserei Their speculation in man-stealing having proved so unfortunate, they were in no very good humour with their excursion, and there was a great difference of...
Chapter V: Hajji Baba Becomes a Robber in His Own Defence, and Invades His Native City At length, after much discussion, it was agreed I should be their guide in Isphahan; that two men should ride close on each side of me, and in case I showed the least symptom of...
Chapter IV: OF HIS INGENUITY IN RESCUING HIS MASTER'S MONEY FROM THE TURCOMAN, AND OF HIS DETERMINATION TO KEEP IT. She was not a person to excite sensations of a tender nature in a novice like me; for, in the first place, she was of an unwieldy size...
Hajji Baba, Chapter 3:Into What Hands Hajji Baba Falls, and the Fortune Which His Razors Proved to Him Following is Chapter 3 of Hajji Baba of Ispahan, an 1824 adventure novel set in 18th century Persia that was written by British diplomat James ...
Hajji Baba, Chapter 2: Hajji Baba Commences His Travels, His Encounter with the Turcomans, and His Captivity Following is Chapter 2 of Hajji Baba of Ispahan, an 1824 adventure novel set in 18th century Persia that was written by British diplomat James...
Hajji Baba, Chapter 1: Of Hajji Baba's Birth and Education Following is Chapter 1 of Hajji Baba of Ispahan, an 1824 adventure novel set in 18th century Persia that was written by British diplomat James Justinian Morier. Additional chapters will follow weekly. We very much hope you will...
The Ballade of Belvidere: Knight Readers might be surprised to learn that this amusing illustrated poem about a knight errant, complete with giants and other dire foes, dates to 1894! It was written by author Ralph W. Bergengren and illustrated by artist R.B. Birch for St. Nicholas, a literary periodical of that era. 
Ill Met in the Necropolis: Part IV
Ill Met in the Necropolis: Part IV The moment of impending violence shattered with the sound of tearing wood and a roar like the fires of Tartarus. The remains of the coffin lid rained down on the assembled thieves in a shower of rotting splinters. Each suspecting trickery but too shaken by the possibility of darkest...
Ill Met in the Necropolis: Part III Continued from Ill Met in the Necropolis: Part II
Ill Met in the Necropolis: Part II Continued from Ill Met in the Necropolis: Part I “Still no casket,” Phokas wheezed, hefting his shovel once more.

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