Things are not going well for our hero. But at least he is safe and sound in an Army hospital. Or is he? Things are getting weird to say the least. 

How about the captain's good idea? Maybe not so good for some.

And our HVT, Haji Jaan? Funny, Jake never thought to ask. Guess he has other things on his mind.

This is an alternate history in which our hero, Jake Charloe, is drawn back to what I believe was the pivotal year for the native peoples of America 1634. It was in this year that the French Jesuits led by the intrepid Jean de Brebeuf (aka le vraie Boeuf or real ox) traveled up the Ottawa River to rebuild their mission among the Huron. What they brought with them was disease and dissension, to include the spotted beast, one of the many names for the dreaded smallpox.

The well-meaning Brebeuf was instrumental in so weakening the Huron that they fell prey to the Iroquois, who in turn lost so many warriors in their British-instigated conflicts, that much of their territory was left open to European settlers. After that, American Indians had no chance. They were driven from their lands and became prairie nomads, succumbing at last when their sustenance, the bison herds were systematically destroyed.

If Jake can save the Huron, he can turn the tide of history. But he has a long way to go from the battlefields of the 21st century Middle East before he can even try, or even realize that he should. And of course he may fail. Take nothing for granted. 

Nothing, however, could stop the volubility of his wife, or calm her rage.From her husband she fell on Zeenab, and from Zeenab she returned again to her husband, until she foamed at the mouth. She was not satisfied with words alone, but seizing the wretched girl by one of the long tresses which hung down her back, with the assistance of the other slaves, she was thrown into the reservoir, where they beat and soused her until both parties were nearly exhausted.

Following is the second chapter of "Colossus of Ylourgne," a 1934 novella by author Clark Ashton Smith that is set in his land of Averoigne, a dark fantasy version of a medieval province in southern France. This engaging and lurid story has influenced role-playing game development more than many people might expect, both credited and uncredited, and inspired images like the one by artist Eugene Jaworski that appears here. This story has six more chapters and we will post another every week or so. We hope you enjoy it!

It is very certain that I never looked up to any one as my mother; but was brought up at hazard among our women, and that my earliest friend was a foal, that live as an inmate with us. It was born in the very tent which my father's wives occupied; and its dam, of the purest Arabian blood, was treated more like one of the family than a quadruped: in fact, it received much more attention than any of the wives; it enjoyed the warmest place in the tent, was beautifully clothed, and in all our journeys was the first object of our cares.

Following is the first chapter of "Colossus of Ylourgne," a 1934 novella by author Clark Ashton Smith that is set in his land of Averoigne, a dark fantasy version of a medieval province in southern France. Suffice it to say that this story has influenced role-playing game development more than many people might expect, both credited and uncredited. This story has seven more chapters and we will post another every week or so. Enjoy! 

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