Following up on leads we discovered in a sunken temple off the coast of Kos Island in a previous quest, our party sailed to the nearby island of Porphyris to investigate possible cult activity on behalf of  of the Titan Polyvotis. Our party consisted of Pelias, Cleric to Poseidon; Ishkuro, Mesopotamian weather mage; Shovelless, Half-Elf Ranger (along with his saber-toothed cat animal companion Titania); Trodecarn, Dwarf Fighter/Combat Engineer; and Holtsmeistur, Dwarf Rogue/Combat Engineer. 

One of our most popular recent episodes of the weekly d-Infinity Live! webcast was devoted to brief "elevator pitches" for game campaigns of various sorts, ranging in duration from a finite number of sessions with an end date in mind to entire settings that might be used indefinitely.

During our "d-Infinity Live!" show on "Bringing Fantasy Cultures to Life," each co-host was asked to give examples of the best and worst portrayals of fantasy cultures in literature, games, and films. My example of what I consider to be one of the very best such depictions appears in a swords-and-sorcery fantasy novella by Robert E.

d-Infinity would like to wish all of its friends and readers Happy Holidays! No, we're not being "Scrooges" by saying "holidays" instead of "Christmas," we just know that is not the only holiday celebrated this time of year.

Wanted to thank all my friends for their wonderful birthday wishes and invite them to celebrate with me by giving away a copy of my swords-and-sorcery fantasy novel Swords of Kos: Necropolis to anyone who would like it! To obtain a free download of it, just follow the link below, which will automatically set you up to download it for free through the DriveThruRPG.com retail site: 

Strange as it may sound, I have been anticipating this blog post for more than a decade. 

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